Best Linux distros for All in year 2021

Welcome to the list of best linux distros. Everyone can find best distro.

1. MX Linux

Details:
MX Linux

MX Linux is a midweight Linux operating system based on Debian stable and using core antiX components, with additional software created or packaged by the MX community.It is developed as a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS communities to use the best tools and talents from each of these distributions. The community's stated goal is to produce "a family of operating systems that are designed to combine elegant and efficient desktops with high stability and solid performance". MX Linux uses the Xfce desktop environment as its flagship, to which it adds a freestanding KDE Plasma version and a unique Fluxbox implementation. Other environments can be added or are available as "spin-off" ISO images.

2. Mint

Details:
Mint

Linux Mint is a community-driven Linux distribution based on Ubuntu which itself is based on Debian, and bundled with a variety of free and open-source applications.It can provide full out-of-the-box multimedia support for those who choose (by ticking one box during its installation process) to include proprietary software such as multimedia codecs.

The Linux Mint project was created by Clément Lefèbvre and is actively maintained by the Linux Mint Team and community.

3. Manjaro

Details:
Manjaro

Manjaro is a free and open-source Linux distribution based on the Arch Linux operating system. Manjaro has a focus on user friendliness and accessibility, and the system itself is designed to work fully "straight out of the box" with its variety of pre-installed software. It features a rolling release update model and uses Pacman as its package manager.

Manjaro Xfce, which features Manjaro's own dark theme as well as the Xfce desktop.

Manjaro KDE, which features Manjaro's own dark Plasma Theme as well as the latest KDE Plasma, Apps and Frameworks.

Manjaro GNOME became the third official version with the Gellivara release and offers the GNOME desktop along with a version of the Manjaro theme.

4. Debian

Details:
Debian

Debian also known as Debian GNU/Linux, is a Linux distribution composed of free and open-source software, developed by the community-supported Debian Project, which was established by Ian Murdock on August 16, 1993. The first version of Debian (0.01) was released on September 15, 1993, and its first stable version (1.1) was released on June 17, 1996. The Debian Stable branch is the most popular edition for personal computers and servers. Debian is also the basis for many other distributions, most notably Ubuntu.

Debian is one of the oldest operating systems based on the Linux kernel. The project is coordinated over the Internet by a team of volunteers guided by the Debian Project Leader and three foundational documents: the Debian Social Contract, the Debian Constitution, and the Debian Free Software Guidelines. New distributions are updated continually, and the next candidate is released after a time-based freeze.

5. deepin

Details:
deepin

Deepin (stylized as deepin; formerly known as Linux Deepin and Hiweed Linux) is a Linux distribution based on Debian's stable branch. It features DDE, the Deepin Desktop Environment, built on Qt and available for various distributions like Arch Linux, Fedora, Manjaro and Ubuntu. As of version 15.10 it also uses dde-kwin, a set of patches for KDE Plasma's window manager. In 2019, Huawei started to ship Linux laptops pre-installed with deepin. Deepin's userbase is predominately Chinese, and it is developed in Wuhan, China by Wuhan Deepin Technology, as of 1 January 2020, a wholly owned subsidiary of UnionTech (统信软件).

6. Ubuntu

Details:
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution based on Debian and composed mostly of free and open-source software. Ubuntu is officially released in three editions: Desktop, Server, and Core for Internet of things devices and robots. All the editions can run on the computer alone, or in a virtual machine. Ubuntu is a popular operating system for cloud computing, with support for OpenStack. Ubuntu's default desktop has been GNOME, since version 17.10.

Ubuntu is released every six months, with long-term support (LTS) releases every two years.

Ubuntu is developed by Canonical, and a community of other developers, under a meritocratic governance model. Canonical provides security updates and support for each Ubuntu release, starting from the release date and until the release reaches its designated end-of-life (EOL) date.

Ubuntu is named after the Nguni philosophy of ubuntu, which Canonical indicates means "humanity to others" with a connotation of "I am what I am because of who we all are".

7. Solus

Details:
Solus

Solus (previously known as Evolve OS) is an independently developed operating system for the x86-64 architecture based on the Linux kernel and a choice of the homegrown Budgie desktop environment, GNOME, MATE or KDE Plasma as the desktop environment. Its package manager, eopkg, is based on the PiSi package management system from Pardus Linux, and it has a semi-rolling release model, with new package updates landing in the stable repository every Friday. The developers of Solus have stated that Solus is intended exclusively for use on personal computers and will not include software that is only useful in enterprise or server environments.

8. openSUSE

Details:
openSUSE

openSUSE, formerly SUSE Linux, is a Linux distribution sponsored by SUSE Software Solutions Germany GmbH (formerly SUSE Linux GmbH) and other companies. Its "Leap" variant shares a common code base with, and is a direct upgradable installation for the commercially-produced SUSE Linux Enterprise, effectively making openSUSE Leap a non-commercial version of the enterprise product. It is widely used throughout the world. The focus of its development is creating usable open-source tools for software developers and system administrators, while providing a user-friendly desktop and feature-rich server environment.

9. Fedora

Details:
Fedora

The Fedora Project is an independent project to co-ordinate the development of Fedora Linux, a Linux kernel-based operating system, operating with the vision of "a world where everyone benefits from free and open source software built by inclusive, welcoming, and open-minded communities." The project's mission statement is to create "an innovative platform for hardware, clouds, and containers that enables software developers and community members to build tailored solutions for their users". The project also oversees Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux, a special interest group which maintains the eponymous packages. The project was founded in 2003 as a result of a merger between the Red Hat Linux (RHL) and Fedora Linux projects. It is sponsored by Red Hat primarily, but its employees make up only 35% of project contributors, and most of the over 2,000 contributors are unaffiliated members of the community.

10. Pop!_OS

Details:
Pop!_OS

Pop!_OS is a free and open-source Linux distribution, based upon Ubuntu, featuring a custom GNOME desktop. The distribution is developed by American Linux computer manufacturer System76. Pop!_OS is primarily built to be bundled with the computers built by System76, but can also be downloaded and installed on most computers.

Pop!_OS provides full out-of-the-box support for both AMD and Nvidia GPUs. It is regarded as an easy distribution to set up for gaming, mainly due to its built-in GPU support. Pop!_OS provides default disk encryption, streamlined window and workspace management, keyboard shortcuts for navigation as well as built in power management profiles. The latest releases also have packages that allow for easy setup for TensorFlow and CUDA.

Pop!_OS is maintained primarily by System76, with the release version source code hosted in a GitHub repository. Unlike many other Linux distributions it is not community-driven, although outside programmers can contribute, view and modify the source code. They can also build custom ISO images and redistribute them under another name.