Best Linux distros for Beginners in year 2021

Welcome to the list of best linux distros. Everyone can find best distro.

1. MX Linux

Details:
MX Linux

MX Linux is a midweight Linux operating system based on Debian stable and using core antiX components, with additional software created or packaged by the MX community.It is developed as a cooperative venture between the antiX and former MEPIS communities to use the best tools and talents from each of these distributions. The community's stated goal is to produce "a family of operating systems that are designed to combine elegant and efficient desktops with high stability and solid performance". MX Linux uses the Xfce desktop environment as its flagship, to which it adds a freestanding KDE Plasma version and a unique Fluxbox implementation. Other environments can be added or are available as "spin-off" ISO images.

2. Mint

Details:
Mint

Linux Mint is a community-driven Linux distribution based on Ubuntu which itself is based on Debian, and bundled with a variety of free and open-source applications.It can provide full out-of-the-box multimedia support for those who choose (by ticking one box during its installation process) to include proprietary software such as multimedia codecs.

The Linux Mint project was created by Clément Lefèbvre and is actively maintained by the Linux Mint Team and community.

3. Ubuntu

Details:
Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a Linux distribution based on Debian and composed mostly of free and open-source software. Ubuntu is officially released in three editions: Desktop, Server, and Core for Internet of things devices and robots. All the editions can run on the computer alone, or in a virtual machine. Ubuntu is a popular operating system for cloud computing, with support for OpenStack. Ubuntu's default desktop has been GNOME, since version 17.10.

Ubuntu is released every six months, with long-term support (LTS) releases every two years.

Ubuntu is developed by Canonical, and a community of other developers, under a meritocratic governance model. Canonical provides security updates and support for each Ubuntu release, starting from the release date and until the release reaches its designated end-of-life (EOL) date.

Ubuntu is named after the Nguni philosophy of ubuntu, which Canonical indicates means "humanity to others" with a connotation of "I am what I am because of who we all are".

4. Pop!_OS

Details:
Pop!_OS

Pop!_OS is a free and open-source Linux distribution, based upon Ubuntu, featuring a custom GNOME desktop. The distribution is developed by American Linux computer manufacturer System76. Pop!_OS is primarily built to be bundled with the computers built by System76, but can also be downloaded and installed on most computers.

Pop!_OS provides full out-of-the-box support for both AMD and Nvidia GPUs. It is regarded as an easy distribution to set up for gaming, mainly due to its built-in GPU support. Pop!_OS provides default disk encryption, streamlined window and workspace management, keyboard shortcuts for navigation as well as built in power management profiles. The latest releases also have packages that allow for easy setup for TensorFlow and CUDA.

Pop!_OS is maintained primarily by System76, with the release version source code hosted in a GitHub repository. Unlike many other Linux distributions it is not community-driven, although outside programmers can contribute, view and modify the source code. They can also build custom ISO images and redistribute them under another name.

5. Zorin

Details:
Zorin

Zorin OS is a personal computer operating system designed and promoted for users new to Linux-based computers. One of its built-in features lets users change the interface to resemble those of Microsoft Windows or MacOS. Wine and PlayOnLinux can be easily installed in Zorin OS, allowing users to run Windows software for ease of transition and gaming. Zorin OS's creators maintain three free-of-charge editions of the operating system, and an "Ultimate" edition for purchase.